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photos-hardware-01-20090608iphone-3g-japaniPhone is doing better in Japan than Wired.com expected … much better! Nikkei.net has posted a report on Japanese tech market research company’s (BCN’s) survey of Japanese handset sales. This was not just a tiny sampling. 2,300 stores that sell mobile phones participated in the BCN survey.  The results? In the smartphone category, the iPhone 3G 8GB easily came in at number one followed by the 16GB iPhone. The NTT CoCoMo Aquos SH-04A came in at number three. The iPhone 3GS launched just days ago (too late for the BCN survey) and with its enhanced camera and video capability, it’s a fair bet that iPhone 3GS will quickly move up the list of hot ys_iph02smartphones in Japan.

Smartphone best sellers in Japan:

  1. iPhone 3G 8GB
  2. iPhone 3G 16GB
  3. Aquos SH-04A
Shiho Hishida poses with her new Apple iPhone

Shiho Hishida poses with her new Apple iPhone

The report said that while ordinary cellphone sales are plummeting, smartphone sales have grown by nearly 80 percent in a year.

Perhaps it’s time for Wired.com to re-write (again) their anti-iPhone hit piece (Why the Japanese Hate iPhone)? It seems that carrying an iPhone in Japan doesn’t make you “look pretty lame” as Wired erroneously concluded.

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Apple’s iPhone bested all major smartphone competitors in consumer satisfaction. This according to the vaunted JD Power organization. Read PR or click over to read full details through > Fortune’s Apple 2.0

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Why you are soon going to own a smartphone

Cell phones provide everything you need in one device

By Sol Tran

Read full post > HERE

Issue date: 10/16/08 Section: Scene

Originally published: 10/16/08 at 1:03 AM PST
Last update: 10/16/08 at 1:16 AM PST

 

 

Snap! I take a picture of my friend Jaysen and I at a local restaurant and upload it to Facebook in seconds using my handy dandy iPhone. 

As we munch on our food, I swing my hand as I show him iBowling, a new motion sensor game I just downloaded on my phone. Jaysen raves over the new song “Love Lockdown” by Kanye West, so I decide to give it a listen and download it onto my iPhone in just a few minutes.

There is so much I can do with my phone. Yet, when it comes to paying the bill, I still rely on my old-fashioned credit card. But with the rapid growth of the mobile phone, I expect that to change in a few years.

We can’t use our phones as credit cards yet — at least not in the United States — but with the invention of the iPhone, we are on our way there. The features on the iPhone are already astonishing. With it I can sing karaoke, tape interviews with celebrities on the go, talk to voters in battleground states, listen to music, look up drinking games and cocktail recipes, check my Facebook events, chat on AIM and, oh yeah, make phone calls.

Yet we are still behind Asian countries like South Korea and Japan in phone technology. 

Looking at their technology gives us a glimpse of what is to come here. 

Not everybody in the U.S. has an iPhone or smartphone, a term used to denote phones with advanced capabilities, but in Asia these types of phones have become the norm.

In China, some were watching live Olympic broadcasts on their phones while commuting home from work. Students in Nagasaki can go shopping in Tokyo for the first time and find information about a store just by pointing their cell phones at it. 

By 2013, I wonder if we’ll even be buying cameras as Christmas gifts anymore (unless you are shopping for an aspiring photographer). If we do, it will be the one on cell phones. 

With phone cameras already reaching 8 megapixels, such as that on the LG KC780, it’ll only be a matter of time before smartphones are forced to improve their camera features in order to compete with regular digital cameras. The iPhone only has a 2 megapixel camera and no flash.

At this rate, it doesn’t seem like it will take much longer before smartphones become standard for us in the States. 

About 10 million iPhones have already been sold, and competition is springing up fast from Google with its new Android platform available on the T-Mobile G1 phone. 

If you look around, you probably can find a few classmates using either a BlackBerry, iPhone or some other smartphone.

This is why capitalism is so beautiful: competition, baby. The iPhone is now only $199 with a two-year contract, and the new T-Mobile G1 Android phone is even cheaper at $179.99. 

With a market that already includes competition such as Research In Motion’s Blackberry Storm, HTC’s Touch Pro and LG’s Dare, expect the prices of smartphones to plummet even further and features to get even better. What does that mean? We will all have one very soon.

On top of that, multiple industries are emerging as a result. We’re seeing a mobile platform system industry surface as Windows Mobile, Palm OS, Apple, Blackberry and Google compete. Nokia, Motorola and China’s TechFaith are also jumping into the industry.

There is also the mobile payments industry. While it has taken off in Asia and parts of Europe, it doesn’t seem like it will be too long before I’ll be able to buy a bean burrito from Taco Bell using my cell phone right here in Santa Clara.

MasterCard is already moving into the industry fast, saying it expects mobile payments to be the norm in the United States by 2011. Juniper Research also speculates that the mobile payments industry will be a $375 billion market by 2013.

It looks like soon we are going to be leaving our credit cards, flashlights, cameras, iPods, Game Boys, computer notebooks and maps at home, because all we’re going to need is our mobile phone. 

Read full post > HERE

Contact Sol Tran at vtrankiem@scu.edu.


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Smart mobile devices one of fastest growing segments in tech industry, says Canalys

Canalys – February 7, 2008

Smart mobile device shipments hit 118 million in 2007, up 53 percent on 2006 levels, according to Canalys. The analyst firm’s latest market data shows how much the converged device market, which includes all smart phones and wireless handhelds, has grown over the past year. These, typically high-end, devices represented around 10 percent of the global mobile phone market by units in 2007, with annual growth of 60 percent — making them one of the fastest growing segments of the technology industry.

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Annual highlights

v    Converged device shipments (smart phones and wireless handhelds) rose 60% to hit 115 million in 2007

v    Shipments of handhelds fell 47% to 3.0 million, from 5.6 million in 2006

v    APAC is the largest region by volume — 47.9 million units in 2007, ahead of EMEA at 45.9 million

v    North America is growing fast — shipments doubled to 20.9 million, from 10.3 million in 2006

v    Nokia remained global market leader, shipping 60.5 million smart phones

v    RIM shipments grew 112% year-on-year to 12.2 million, strengthening its second place position

v    By OS provider, Symbian leads on 67% share, followed by Microsoft on 13%, with RIM on 10%.

Q4 highlights — converged devices

v    Converged device shipments rose 72% year-on-year in Q4 2007, the highest growth seen all year

v    Nokia and RIM retained their number one and two positions

v    Apple achieved third place despite its limited geographic coverage, with 7% share

v    APAC converged device shipments rose 23%, EMEA 79%, and North America 222%

v    Symbian leads with 65% share, ahead of Microsoft on 12%, RIM on 11%, Apple on 7%, and Linux at 5%

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Apple

Apple’s entry into this market in 2007 with the iPhone sparked a lot of media attention and speculation about how much it could disrupt the status quo and take share away from companies such as Nokia, RIM, Palm and Motorola.

“When you consider that it launched part way through the year, with limited operator and country coverage, and essentially just one product, Apple has shown very clearly that it can make a difference and has sent a wakeup call to the market leaders,” said Pete Cunningham, Canalys senior analyst. “What it must demonstrate now is that it can build a sustainable business in the converged device space, expanding its coverage and product portfolio. It will also need to ensure that the exclusive relationships that got it so far so quickly do not prove to be a limit on what it can achieve. Apple’s innovation in its mobile phone user interface has prompted a lot of design activity among competitors. We saw the beginnings of that in 2007, but we will see a lot more in 2008 as other smart phone vendors try to catch up and then get back in front. Experience shows that a vendor with only one smart phone design, no matter how good that design is, will soon struggle. A broad, continually refreshed portfolio is needed to retain and grow share in this dynamic market. This race is a marathon, but you pretty much have to sprint every lap.” iphone.png

Canalys estimates that Apple took 28% share of the fast growing US converged device market in Q4 2007, behind RIM’s 41%, but a long way ahead of third placed Palm on 9%. This was also enough to put Apple ahead of all Windows Mobile device vendors combined, whose share was 21% in the quarter according to Canalys figures.

In EMEA, where the iPhone officially launched part way through the quarter in only three countries, Apple took fifth spot behind Nokia, RIM, HTC and Motorola, but ahead of several established smart phone providers such as Sony Ericsson, Samsung and Palm.

Asia Pacific leads

For the full year 2007, as in 2006, the Asia Pacific region was the biggest in volume terms for converged device shipments. Apple has of course not yet launched the iPhone in the region, and many vendors who are successful in other parts of the world, such as RIM and Palm, have also made relatively little impact there so far. 

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Nokia continues to lead in the region, with more than 50% share in converged devices, ahead of Japanese smart phone vendors Sharp and Fujitsu. Motorola, despite enjoying fourth place, has seen its Linux-based smart phone shipments in the region fall 28% from their high in 2006.

Linux opportunity lingers

“The mobile Linux opportunity remains just that — an opportunity,” added Rachel Lashford, manager of Canalys in APAC, “Total Linux-based phone shipments in 2007 were almost flat on 2006. There is still too much fragmentation and not enough momentum for any single open standard around which the energy of developers, manufacturers and operators can coalesce.”

Nokia’s recent announcement of its intention to acquire Trolltech will no doubt have raised questions among some of Trolltech’s mobile phone producing partners about their Linux implementation strategy going forward. Meanwhile Google’s Android initiative, like others before it, remains an idea yet to turn into viable commercial products widely accepted by both mobile network operators and the mass market. Although off to a slow start, Canalys expects Linux will account for a significant proportion of mobile phone shipments within the next few years.

Lashford continued: “Rising consumer interest in having a rich, high-speed browsing experience on a mobile device, and the demand for visually sophisticated navigation and location applications will attract more companies into this arena. Flattening mobile data costs, and the advertising-funded possibilities generated by location-based services, will help reduce usage barriers. Improvements in the underlying technologies and innovation in user interfaces will lead to more usable devices. All these factors will help push the high-end mobile phone and smart phone segments forward. Meanwhile supply-side concerns around time to market and build and support costs will drive the industry to look for economies of scale. Mobile Linux can have a big part to play in this future, but at the moment the maturity of the other mobile operating systems puts them a long way ahead.”

Symbian

In Q4 2007, Canalys estimates that Symbian had a 65% share of worldwide converged device shipments, ahead of Microsoft on 12% and RIM on 11%. By region, Symbian led in APAC and EMEA with 85% and 80% shares respectively, while in North America RIM was the clear leader on 42%, ahead of Apple on 27% and Microsoft at 21%.

About this data

The Canalys “Smart Mobile Device Analysis” services provide a coherent view of the total market for smart phones, handhelds and wireless handhelds. Clients receive quarterly market updates, regular reports, trends presentations and forecasts, and direct access to the Canalys analysts. Canalys offers services looking at the smart mobile device markets by country in Asia Pacific, North and Latin America and EMEA, as well as providing global market overviews. It also has services focusing specifically on the rapidly developing markets for mobile navigation and Linux-based mobile phones, and survey-based analysis of consumer and enterprise attitudes and preferences toward mobile applications, products and services.

» Story on Analyst Firm Website

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Apple 2.0

Mac news from outside the reality distortion field – by Philip Elmer-DeWitt

Survey: Apple, RIM benefit most from “seismic shift” to smartphones >HERE

February 8, 2008

EXECRPT: Apple’s (AAPL) iPhone and Research in Motion (RIMM)’s BlackBerry appear to be the primary beneficiaries in what ChangeWave Research describes as a “seismic shift” in the mobile phone market, as record numbers of consumers abandon their basic cell phones for more advanced models. (link)

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The investment group (ChangeWave) polled 4,182 of its members in mid-January and found that the iPhone was the top choice among respondents planning to buy a new cell phone in the next six months (17%) and RIM the second choice (15%).

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Full article >HERE

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Asia-Pacific leads way in converged-device shipment volume

Zafar Anjum02.06.2008

EXCERPT: Though Apple has not yet launched the iPhone in the region, many vendors who are successful in other parts of the world, such as RIM and Palm, have also made relatively little impact there so far in the region, the report by Canalys said.

Commenting on Apple’s entry into this market in 2007 with the iPhone, Pete Cunningham, Canalys senior analyst, said: “When you consider that it launched part way through the year, with limited operator and country coverage, and essentially just one product, Apple has shown very clearly that it can make a difference and has sent a wake-up call to the market leaders.”

Full Article HERE

 

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nokia_logo2.jpg    rim-logo.jpg   aapllogo.jpg 

Apple grabs healthy share of smartphone market

EXCERPT: full article > HERE …The latest market data from analyst firm Canalys shows how much the converged device (smart phone) market has grown over the past year.

These, typically high-end, devices represented around 10% of the global mobile phone market by units in 2007, with annual growth of 60% making them one of the fastest growing segments of the technology industry. Year-on-year growth climbed every quarter throughout 2007, to reach a peak of 72% in Q4.

Canalys estimates that Apple took 28% share of the fast growing U.S. converged device market in Q4 2007, behind RIM’s 41%, but a long way ahead of third placed Palm on 9%. This was also enough to put Apple ahead of all Windows Mobile device vendors combined, whose share was 21% in the quarter according to Canalys figures. In EMEA, where the iPhone officially launched part way through the quarter in only three countries, Apple took fifth spot behind Nokia, RIM, HTC and Motorola, but ahead of several established smart phone providers such as Sony Ericsson, Samsung and Palm.

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What would Ballmer say today about iPhone market share?steve-ballmer.jpg

MacDailyNews >Take

“There’s no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It’s a $500 subsidized item. They may make a lot of money. But if you actually take a look at the 1.3 billion phones that get sold, I’d prefer to have our software in 60% or 70% or 80% of them, than I would to have 2% or 3%, which is what Apple might get.” – Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, April 30, 2007

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer laughes at Apple iPhone, BSes, and makes up market share percentages, January 17, 2007:

Direct link via YouTube: YouTube 

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